Easwari

Career Adviser


3 Defining Elements of a Hospitality Resume

What are the Defining Elements of Your Hospitality Resume?

By Anish Majumdar, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) 

Developing a new Hospitality resume can be a daunting prospect. What’s the best way to present yourself? Which elements of your career should be highlighted (and which left off)? One common misconception is that every part of your resume should be 100% original. Not only is this an incredible time-consuming approach, it has been shown, time and time again, to be ineffective. 

When recruiters and hiring agents evaluate a potential candidate, they’re primarily searching for 3-4 defining elements. The appeal of these elements are the driver behind who gets selected for interviews, and ultimately, who gets a job offer. Therefore, the main responsibility of your resume isn’t being original, but communicating these 3-4 defining elements in a variety of ways. 

Here are 3 ways to bring your defining elements to the forefront of your resume:

1. Develop A Powerful Opening Paragraph

A powerful resume opening “frames” the rest of the document, quickly outlining the areas where a candidate feels strongest and differentiating him or her from the competition. As a professional in the Hospitality industry, it’s your job to boil down everything you’ve accomplished to date into a list of 3-4 defining attributes. Feel free to be creative here; some candidates might wish to highlight a specialized certification, while others might want to call attention to a high-level responsibility at their previous job. Keep it short and to-the-point. When executed correctly, a strong opening paragraph will consistently result in a more in-depth examination of your resume by recruiters and hiring agents. 

2. Expand Upon Your Opening Paragraph In The Work History 

Many Hospitality jobseekers make the mistake of developing their work history before tackling the opening paragraph of the resume. Going in the opposite direction is a much more effective approach, as it will enable you to filter your work history through the 3-4 defining attributes you’ve identified. When describing responsibilities for the jobs you’ve held, always highlight those related to your defining attributes first. Also, be sure to create a “Key Accomplishments” or similar section for recent jobs that highlights concrete successes related to them. Never lose sight of the focus of these edits, which is communicating a particular set of skills that will set you apart from other professionals. 

3. Keep Closing Sections Relevant 

By executing the previous 2 steps, you’ve taken control of how you’re perceived as a candidate and made a strong case for why you’re suited for the position you’re applying for. End it on a high note by only highlighting relevant education credits, professional memberships, and other details at the tail end of the resume. The days of including a “Hobbies/Interests” section are long gone. If the content doesn’t directly support your ambitions, leave it off. 

About the Author 

Anish Majumdar, CPRW is a Career Expert and Owner at ResumeOrbit.com. 98% of clients report an increase in interviews within 30 days, and all work comes backed by a 110% Satisfaction or Money Back Guarantee (in writing). Submit your resume for a free critique today!

 


Resumes for Your Senior Job Search

Resumes are the point of first impression for recruiters and employers. Unless your  carries the right impact, unfortunately, it can also be the last impression! While much has been spoken and written aboutresumes, resume-writing for senior professionals is doubly challenging. But for each of the challenges of resume writing there is a workaround that lets you create a resume that will take you ahead in your senior job search.

 

    • Complete information: HR professionals, recruiters and employers see hundreds of resumes every week. Even when it comes to a senior Resume, a recruiter spends just between six seconds and half a minute to decide whether to shortlist the resume. That’s why it is important to make sure the information that you pack into your resume covers what the hiring team needs to assess your profile. For example, there could be a temptation of highlighting an achievement, which recruiters might not pay heed to. The deal is to list relevant information that positions one as an apt fit for the kind of job opportunities one is looking for.
    • Two-page formula: A senior professional’s  profile can run into many pages, but a corollary of the last point is that your Resume should NEVER run beyond 2 pages. It’s not just about what to keep, but it’s equally important to have clarity about what you should leave out of your resume. Be careful while including details such as Passport Number, as these are only required in some cases. There are many details that should only be provided when asked for.
    • Not getting  calls: Even when the market is facing a job crunch, the right set of talent is always in demand. If you are not getting calls at all, or if recruiters are not considering you for the right , your resume could be the culprit. In such a scenario don’t stop your job search; rather work on a better resume, preferably with an expert, professional resume consultant.
  • The right kind of resume writer: While you know your career best, there could be compelling reasons to work with a resume writer. Aside from the fact that you may be short of time to give your resume adequate attention, an expert resume writer will understand your career goals and ensure that your resume reflects those. Professional resume writers also know how to write your resume so that it meets recruitment best practices. They can advise you on resume content, format & styling often based on the industry vertical that you work in.

Is your resume holding you back?

At a senior level, it is crucial for a professional to present one’s credentials effectively.
Don’t be amongst those highly qualified and deserving senior candidates who miss out on the critical success factors that go into the making of the ‘right resume’. To recap, these include making sure you capture right information to go into your resume, keep your resume concise, review your resume periodically and finally whenever in doubt get professional resume writers to assist you in crafting your resume.

A professional resume could be all that you need to cross the first level step of your job search.


3 Defining Elements of a Biotech/Pharma Resume

What are the Defining Elements of Your Biotech/Pharma Resume?
By Anish Majumdar, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) 

Developing a new Biotech/Pharma resume can be a daunting prospect. What’s the best way to present yourself? Which elements of your career should be highlighted (and which left off)? One common misconception is that every part of your resume should be 100% original. Not only is this an incredible time-consuming approach, it has been shown, time and time again, to be ineffective. 

When recruiters and hiring agents evaluate a potential candidate, they’re primarily searching for 3-4 defining elements. The appeal of these elements are the driver behind who gets selected for interviews, and ultimately, who gets a job offer. Therefore, the main responsibility of your resume isn’t being original, but communicating these 3-4 defining elements in a variety of ways. 

Here are 3 ways to bring your defining elements to the forefront of your resume: 

1. Develop A Powerful Opening Paragraph 

A powerful resume opening “frames” the rest of the document, quickly outlining the areas where a candidate feels strongest and differentiating him or her from the competition. As a Biotech/Pharma professional, it’s your job to boil down everything you’ve accomplished to date into a list of 3-4 defining attributes. Feel free to be creative here; some candidates might wish to highlight an advanced degree or certification, while others might want to call attention to a high-level responsibility at their previous job. Keep it short and to-the-point. When executed correctly, a strong opening paragraph will consistently result in a more in-depth examination of your resume by recruiters and hiring agents. 

2. Expand Upon Your Opening Paragraph In The Work History 

Many Biotech/Pharma jobseekers make the mistake of developing their work history before tackling the opening paragraph of the resume. Going in the opposite direction is a much more effective approach, as it will enable you to filter your work history through the 3-4 defining attributes you’ve identified. When describing responsibilities for the jobs you’ve held, always highlight those related to your defining attributes first. Also, be sure to create a “Key Accomplishments” or similar section for recent jobs that highlights concrete successes related to them. Never lose sight of the focus of these edits, which is communicating a particular set of skills that will set you apart from other professionals. 

3. Keep Closing Sections Relevant 

By executing the previous 2 steps, you’ve taken control of how you’re perceived as a candidate and made a strong case for why you’re suited for the position you’re applying for. End it on a high note by only highlighting relevant education credits, professional memberships, and other details at the tail end of the resume.The days of including a “Hobbies/Interests” section are long gone. If the content doesn’t directly support your ambitions, leave it off. 

Read more biotech career tips. Find more biotech and pharma jobs by visiting the career center

About the Author 

Anish Majumdar, CPRW is a Career Expert and Owner at www.ResumeOrbit.com. 98% of clients report and increase in interviews within 30 days, and all work comes backed by a 110% Satisfaction or Money Back Guarantee. Submit your resume for a free critique today!


6 Ways to Prepare Yourself for a Management Job

Management Job

Many people aspire to be promoted to a managerial position as the key part of their career goals. It can be very rewarding. Many people are left pondering, “How do they get on that management track to begin with?” And, “What do I have to do to prepare?”

Both good questions, let’s outline what needs to take place to become a manager.

1. Outline your goals to your management. Get your boss in your corner to help mentor you and to give you opportunities to prove you are management material.

2. Look for opportunities to take on more. A key element to a management position is initiative. You won’t be told what to do, you have to assume responsibility and direction. Most groups have far more work than manpower to perform it all. Look for items that will create real impact to the business. Those will get you visibility which is important to your goals.

3. Find a role model. Observe the people who manage and find someone who you believe is both a great manager and is successful. Ask for them to mentor you and observe how they perform theirmanagement job. What makes them successful? You want to emulate some of that behavior.

4. Take classes and read. There are tons of management classes and books on management. Look for ones that are oriented toward the basics and beginning management as they will outline what you need to do in these early days. Higher level materials, while interesting, will assume you know these things and won’t go into much detail.

5. Ask to fill in. The boss will go on vacation or business travel. They have work to be done while they’re away and you can volunteer to cover for them or minimally to pick up some tasks of theirs. This will give you a taste of the work being performed and again demonstrate your ability to take on higher level responsibilities.

6. Seek leadership roles. A great way to get started in management is to take on the role of project management or leader to a work effort. Many of the needed management skills are used in these situations. You are facilitating a group of people to get something accomplished. To do that you will exercise such things as: planning, directing, communicating, gaining agreement, following up, and so on. Projects are a key way for business to get done and someone has to lead the effort – that can be you.

If you prepare yourself well, your first management position it can be the thing that will catapult you into higher levels and greater impact to your business. You need to make sure that at this stage you have thought through just how different this job is from what you have done before so you can shift gears to be equally awesome as a manager.

 


How Technology Helps You Build a Personal Learning Network

Technology Personal Learning Network

 

Technology has become an integral part of classroom life. While students certainly reap the benefits of having a wealth of information at their fingertips, teachers like you can also capitalize on technology’s many uses.

New and veteran teachers alike can utilize the Internet to build their Personal Learning Networks, gaining classroom know-how and connections that will help advance your career.

What is a Personal Learning Network?

Unlike your classroom, your Personal Learning Network (PLN) is available to you seven days a week, 24 hours a day. It consists of all of the educational sites that you join to have discussions with other educators and find classroom resources.

You can participate in scheduled chats on Twitter, write and comment on educational blogs, and join websites that offer discussion forums and other resources. Not only will you gain valuable pedagogical knowledge, you will be able to bounce your own teaching ideas off of peers and administrators.

Twitter

Twitter is one of the best tools for building your PLN. It is a social networking site that allows you to post and receive messages. The messages are called “tweets,” and when you send a tweet, everyone who subscribes to your page (your followers) receives it.

Since Twitter is massive and you may have some difficulty finding the types of groups that you would choose to follow, twitter4teachers was created to organize accounts based on subject areas. The topics include early childhood, English as a second language, 21st century learning and much, much more. You do need an account in order to participate in discussions, which is free and easy to setup. TeachHub also offers scheduled weekly chats for teachers.

Blogging

Blogging has become incredibly popular in classrooms. With a blog (or “web log”), you can write ongoing commentary related to a specific subject. There are a number of websites that offer free blogging tools, like WordPress and Blogger. Teachers can set up blogs to stay connected with parents and students. You can also benefit from reading and commenting on others’ blogs.

For example: USC Rossier offers information on continuing education, classroom management and other aspects of education on their blog; Teach.com cover the latest educational news; and Certification Map has teacher profiles and other interesting tidbits.

A note about blogging: As With anything that you post to cyberspace, be mindful of what you write on your blog or as comments on the blogs of others. Once you post, you leave a “cyber footprint” that others can view (including students, parents and administrators).

Other Resources

Pinterest is an online pinboard on which you can share and discover lessons and resources. Many schools and organizations have Facebookpages that can be useful for organizing or even just socializing. Teach Hub, as mentioned earlier, also offers education news, teaching blogs and lesson plans. And remember: More invaluable resources are just a Google search away!

 


The Best Interview Tips For Older Job Seekers

“I’m worried that the boss will hire someone far younger than me,” is a statement often heard from older job hunters. In truth, chances are that younger candidates are in hot pursuit of that dream opportunity, and the issue of age in hiring practices is a real one.

In the face of this competition, here are a few tips to turn your years of experience to your advantage:

1. Demonstrate passion for what you do. Lean forward a little in your chair, speak in a clear but animated fashion, and explain how something specific in the role that you’re discussing gets your juices flowing. Share a previous relevant experience, and how personally satisfying that work made you feel. Demonstrate your perspective by relating your role to something larger than just the daily responsibilities. For example, you might acknowledge how the company’s products or services make people’s lives better.

Your enthusiasm and passion for excellence will go a long way toward easing any employer’s worry that you’re seeking a paycheck to ease your way toward social security, rather than to have an opportunity to remain productive. What manager doesn’t want to hire someone who brings a real sense of purpose and importance to what they do, day in and day out?

2. Know how you will respond to inappropriate questions. If the human resources department is doing its job, interviewers will be well coached in what questions or topics can’t be broached in a job interview. Nonetheless, some ill-informed and prejudiced individuals still possess management roles. Don’t go into the interview overly defensive, or with a chip on your shoulder.

There are any number of ways for an interviewer to misstep, and there is no “one right way” to respond. If something inappropriate such as age-related bias comes to the fore, try to turn the situation around. For example, if an interviewer begins to focus in on your age, you can speak calmly about how your knowledge, combined with your years of experience, prepares you to respond to situations with confidence, expertise, and without drama.

3. Don’t assume that anyone else knows what you take for granted. Often, highly skilled and experienced people assume that everyone knows what they do, or that they do it the same way. Or, you may feel that the respect you have earned in the past should somehow transfer into a new environment. Not so! With each new employer you’re starting from square one. You need to demonstrate your character, abilities, what specifically you did, and how you did it.

Get ready for the interview by stepping back and breaking your work history down to its most basic elements. Think about who you interacted with, the size and scope of your work, plus all the steps it took to get from point A to point B. Turn this analysis into stories, each of which can highlight some aspect of your knowledge, skill set, and the value you bring with you to your next employer.

You have a track record, and it demonstrates your capacity to create further accomplishments if given the opportunity. When you share stories of your successes over the years, you turn your history to your advantage.

Your role as a job hunter is to educate your interviewer about what you did, how you did it, and the difference you made in your work place. When you do this well and with enthusiasm, your age becomes an asset that makes you an extremely attractive candidate.

Happy Hunting!

Arnie Fertig is the head coach of JOBHUNTERCOACH.COM, where he utilizes his extensive background in HR Staffing and as owner of a recruiting company to help mid-career job-hunters land their next job. Arnie provides one-to-one coaching services to individuals throughout the U.S. in all aspects of the job hunt, including: resume writing, personal branding, utilizing social media, enhancing networking skills, preparing for interviews, and negotiating compensation.


Why We are Not Water

It’s easy to find reasons not to move forward.  Fear is such a powerful motivator that it seems we even seek it out sometimes as an avoidance technique.  Fears are exactly what keeps an otherwise talented person from becoming what they want, it’s what stops them from achieving a life that they truly desire.

Many aspire to the lofty seat of consulting or contract work.  The idea of self employment has become very popular in an age where lay offs are as common as the news papers who deliver news of them.  Yet, having been born, raised and bred in a society which preaches the safest possible courses, the paths which offer the least resistance and most social capital.

Water

Water is often considered one of the most powerful elements.  Poets, philosophers, business leaders, martial artists, nearly everyone has summoned water as a positive metaphor in their respective fields.  Rivers flowing towards lakes and oceans, oceans symbolizing mystery and power.  No one, however, seems to discuss what water is doing wrong.

Water is always going downhill.  Water follows the course of least possible resistance.  When it hits an obstacle, it looks for ways around rather that finding ways through.  A river will go for hundreds of miles to circumnavigate a mountain range.  And when water hits a cliff?  When it’s back is against the edge?  Where does it go?  Water jumps.  Water Falls.  Water keeps running.

Do we want to be water?  keeping yourself trapped by fear will keep you running like water.  In a safe, assured path that everyone else is floating down.  You’ll start close to the top of the mountain with your ambitions and will – despite your progress – be pulled further and further from your dreams of the summit.

Water very rarely rises.   When it does – tides, waves – it does so only temporarily.  Water only rises by the will of talented and dedicated individuals.  Humans are the only time water ever rises.  We build dams to create lakes, we redirect rivers, we create fountains.  The human capacity for leadership, innovation and dedication is the only thing that can make water stop running.

So why are you running?  What’s holding you back?  What stream are you caught within that is keeping you bound downstream, away from you goals?  Are you paddling against the current, working to head back upstream?

It’s a difficult task.  Often the only way we’re given a chance to get out of that water is to completely step out, and that can be even scarier.  Leaving a job with no guarantees is a terrifying prospect, but it’s also the best way to ensure you can dedicate your energies to getting back toward that summit.