Easwari

Career Adviser


Attention Jobseekers and Recruiters

Job Seeker Benefits:

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Meet Face-to-Face with employers

Ø 3.00 Welcome From RBTC
Ø 3:15 Trends in Technology :For Today and Tommmorw by Techfetch 
Ø 3:45 Do’s and Don’ts-Tips from an HR professional(Q&A Session)

On-site Resources:

Resume help,Recruiting Companies,Career Coaching/Evaluation.

And Online Resume Bowl:

For those who can’t attend, just register:http://bit.ly/QOT6u0

FREE for all attendees.

Employer Job Fair Package Includes:

1. 8’ x 10’ booth size
2. 1 table & 2 participants
3. Company name listing on job fair promotions
4. 10 job postings at techfetch.com
5. 100 resume view from techfetch.com

Employer Job Fair Benefits are:
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1. Meeting local available talent face-to-face
2. Access nationwide online applicant that would relocate to Virginia
3. Reach passive and confidential candidates

Registration Link: http://bit.ly/QOT6u0

Reserve your booth today. Call: 703-544-2050 , 703-544-2051

Special Discount for techfetch & Washington Technology Industry Association (WTIA) Members

Date: Wednesday, October 24, 2012.

Venue: 710 williamson Road
Roanoke,VA 24016

Timings: 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM


Best Interview Technique You Never Use

The more questions you ask, the more you learn about a job candidate, right? Wrong. Here’s a better strategy.

Eventually, almost every interview turns into a question-and-answer session. You ask a question. The candidate answers as you check a mental tick-box (good answer? bad answer?).

You quickly go to the next question and the next question and the next question, because you only have so much time and there’s a lot of ground to cover because you want to evaluate the candidate thoroughly. The more questions you ask, the more you will learn about the candidate.Or not.

Sometimes, instead of asking questions, the best interviewing technique is to listen slowly.

In Change-Friendly Leadership, management coach Rodger Dean Duncan describes how he learned about listening slowly from PBS NewsHour anchor Jim Lehrer:

Duncan: He urged me to ask a good question, listen attentively to the answer, and then count silently to five before asking another question. At first that suggestion seemed silly. I argued that five seconds would seem like an eternity to wait after someone responds to a question. Then it occurred to me: Of course it would seem like an eternity, because our natural tendency is to fill a void with sound, usually that of our own voice.

Lehrer: If you resist the temptation to respond too quickly to the answer, you’ll discover something almost magical. The other person will either expand on what he’s already said or he’ll go in a different direction. Either way, he’s expanding his response, and you get a clear view into his head and heart.

Duncan: Giving other people sufficient psychological breathing room seemed to work wonders. When I bridled my natural impatience to get on with it, they seemed more willing to disclose, explore, and even be a bit vulnerable. When I treated the interview more as a conversation with a purpose than as a sterile interrogation, the tone of the exchange softened. It was now just two people talking…

Listening slowly can turn a Q&A session into more of a conversation. Try listening slowly in your next interviews. (Not after every question, of course: Pausing for five seconds after a strictly factual answer will leave you both feeling really awkward.)

Just pick a few questions that give candidates room for self-analysis or introspection, and after the initial answer, pause. They’ll fill the space: with an additional example, a more detailed explanation, a completely different perspective on the question.

Once you give candidates a silent hole to fill, they’ll fill it, often in unexpected and surprising ways. A shy candidate may fill the silence by sharing positive information she wouldn’t have otherwise shared. A candidate who came prepared with “perfect” answers to typical interview questions may fill the silence with not-so-positive information he never intended to disclose.

And all candidates will open up and speak more freely when they realize you’re not just asking questions–you’re listening.


3 Defining Elements of a Hospitality Resume

What are the Defining Elements of Your Hospitality Resume?

By Anish Majumdar, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) 

Developing a new Hospitality resume can be a daunting prospect. What’s the best way to present yourself? Which elements of your career should be highlighted (and which left off)? One common misconception is that every part of your resume should be 100% original. Not only is this an incredible time-consuming approach, it has been shown, time and time again, to be ineffective. 

When recruiters and hiring agents evaluate a potential candidate, they’re primarily searching for 3-4 defining elements. The appeal of these elements are the driver behind who gets selected for interviews, and ultimately, who gets a job offer. Therefore, the main responsibility of your resume isn’t being original, but communicating these 3-4 defining elements in a variety of ways. 

Here are 3 ways to bring your defining elements to the forefront of your resume:

1. Develop A Powerful Opening Paragraph

A powerful resume opening “frames” the rest of the document, quickly outlining the areas where a candidate feels strongest and differentiating him or her from the competition. As a professional in the Hospitality industry, it’s your job to boil down everything you’ve accomplished to date into a list of 3-4 defining attributes. Feel free to be creative here; some candidates might wish to highlight a specialized certification, while others might want to call attention to a high-level responsibility at their previous job. Keep it short and to-the-point. When executed correctly, a strong opening paragraph will consistently result in a more in-depth examination of your resume by recruiters and hiring agents. 

2. Expand Upon Your Opening Paragraph In The Work History 

Many Hospitality jobseekers make the mistake of developing their work history before tackling the opening paragraph of the resume. Going in the opposite direction is a much more effective approach, as it will enable you to filter your work history through the 3-4 defining attributes you’ve identified. When describing responsibilities for the jobs you’ve held, always highlight those related to your defining attributes first. Also, be sure to create a “Key Accomplishments” or similar section for recent jobs that highlights concrete successes related to them. Never lose sight of the focus of these edits, which is communicating a particular set of skills that will set you apart from other professionals. 

3. Keep Closing Sections Relevant 

By executing the previous 2 steps, you’ve taken control of how you’re perceived as a candidate and made a strong case for why you’re suited for the position you’re applying for. End it on a high note by only highlighting relevant education credits, professional memberships, and other details at the tail end of the resume. The days of including a “Hobbies/Interests” section are long gone. If the content doesn’t directly support your ambitions, leave it off. 

About the Author 

Anish Majumdar, CPRW is a Career Expert and Owner at ResumeOrbit.com. 98% of clients report an increase in interviews within 30 days, and all work comes backed by a 110% Satisfaction or Money Back Guarantee (in writing). Submit your resume for a free critique today!

 


3 Defining Elements of a Biotech/Pharma Resume

What are the Defining Elements of Your Biotech/Pharma Resume?
By Anish Majumdar, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) 

Developing a new Biotech/Pharma resume can be a daunting prospect. What’s the best way to present yourself? Which elements of your career should be highlighted (and which left off)? One common misconception is that every part of your resume should be 100% original. Not only is this an incredible time-consuming approach, it has been shown, time and time again, to be ineffective. 

When recruiters and hiring agents evaluate a potential candidate, they’re primarily searching for 3-4 defining elements. The appeal of these elements are the driver behind who gets selected for interviews, and ultimately, who gets a job offer. Therefore, the main responsibility of your resume isn’t being original, but communicating these 3-4 defining elements in a variety of ways. 

Here are 3 ways to bring your defining elements to the forefront of your resume: 

1. Develop A Powerful Opening Paragraph 

A powerful resume opening “frames” the rest of the document, quickly outlining the areas where a candidate feels strongest and differentiating him or her from the competition. As a Biotech/Pharma professional, it’s your job to boil down everything you’ve accomplished to date into a list of 3-4 defining attributes. Feel free to be creative here; some candidates might wish to highlight an advanced degree or certification, while others might want to call attention to a high-level responsibility at their previous job. Keep it short and to-the-point. When executed correctly, a strong opening paragraph will consistently result in a more in-depth examination of your resume by recruiters and hiring agents. 

2. Expand Upon Your Opening Paragraph In The Work History 

Many Biotech/Pharma jobseekers make the mistake of developing their work history before tackling the opening paragraph of the resume. Going in the opposite direction is a much more effective approach, as it will enable you to filter your work history through the 3-4 defining attributes you’ve identified. When describing responsibilities for the jobs you’ve held, always highlight those related to your defining attributes first. Also, be sure to create a “Key Accomplishments” or similar section for recent jobs that highlights concrete successes related to them. Never lose sight of the focus of these edits, which is communicating a particular set of skills that will set you apart from other professionals. 

3. Keep Closing Sections Relevant 

By executing the previous 2 steps, you’ve taken control of how you’re perceived as a candidate and made a strong case for why you’re suited for the position you’re applying for. End it on a high note by only highlighting relevant education credits, professional memberships, and other details at the tail end of the resume.The days of including a “Hobbies/Interests” section are long gone. If the content doesn’t directly support your ambitions, leave it off. 

Read more biotech career tips. Find more biotech and pharma jobs by visiting the career center

About the Author 

Anish Majumdar, CPRW is a Career Expert and Owner at www.ResumeOrbit.com. 98% of clients report and increase in interviews within 30 days, and all work comes backed by a 110% Satisfaction or Money Back Guarantee. Submit your resume for a free critique today!