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5 Top Facebook Tips & Tricks


5 Top Facebook Tips & Tricks

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Best Interview Technique You Never Use

The more questions you ask, the more you learn about a job candidate, right? Wrong. Here’s a better strategy.

Eventually, almost every interview turns into a question-and-answer session. You ask a question. The candidate answers as you check a mental tick-box (good answer? bad answer?).

You quickly go to the next question and the next question and the next question, because you only have so much time and there’s a lot of ground to cover because you want to evaluate the candidate thoroughly. The more questions you ask, the more you will learn about the candidate.Or not.

Sometimes, instead of asking questions, the best interviewing technique is to listen slowly.

In Change-Friendly Leadership, management coach Rodger Dean Duncan describes how he learned about listening slowly from PBS NewsHour anchor Jim Lehrer:

Duncan: He urged me to ask a good question, listen attentively to the answer, and then count silently to five before asking another question. At first that suggestion seemed silly. I argued that five seconds would seem like an eternity to wait after someone responds to a question. Then it occurred to me: Of course it would seem like an eternity, because our natural tendency is to fill a void with sound, usually that of our own voice.

Lehrer: If you resist the temptation to respond too quickly to the answer, you’ll discover something almost magical. The other person will either expand on what he’s already said or he’ll go in a different direction. Either way, he’s expanding his response, and you get a clear view into his head and heart.

Duncan: Giving other people sufficient psychological breathing room seemed to work wonders. When I bridled my natural impatience to get on with it, they seemed more willing to disclose, explore, and even be a bit vulnerable. When I treated the interview more as a conversation with a purpose than as a sterile interrogation, the tone of the exchange softened. It was now just two people talking…

Listening slowly can turn a Q&A session into more of a conversation. Try listening slowly in your next interviews. (Not after every question, of course: Pausing for five seconds after a strictly factual answer will leave you both feeling really awkward.)

Just pick a few questions that give candidates room for self-analysis or introspection, and after the initial answer, pause. They’ll fill the space: with an additional example, a more detailed explanation, a completely different perspective on the question.

Once you give candidates a silent hole to fill, they’ll fill it, often in unexpected and surprising ways. A shy candidate may fill the silence by sharing positive information she wouldn’t have otherwise shared. A candidate who came prepared with “perfect” answers to typical interview questions may fill the silence with not-so-positive information he never intended to disclose.

And all candidates will open up and speak more freely when they realize you’re not just asking questions–you’re listening.


How Google+ Can Supplement Your Job Hunt

With Google+ on track to reach 400 million users by the end of 2012, it’s time to get on the bandwagon. However, I am not urging you to join for the sake of having another Facebook to keep up. No, I advise you get involved with Google+ as a means to present your best assets to jobs.

While LinkedIn is still a valuable asset for those who are unemployed and networking, Google+ has the potential to reach a broader audience, and present you in a more well-rounded light. The top three attributes an employer is looking for are technical skills, interpersonal skills and strength of character; Google+ can help you present this.

Google+ brings together the best of Facebook and LinkedIn. You can upload photos, giving employers a snap shot of who you are, present your accomplishments in an organized way, and then direct them to your other social networks. With your Google+ profile on a resume, you can rest easy knowing your potential boss is seeing the most employable side of you.

Portfolio

The most important aspect of Google+ as a resume extension is the portfolio feature. Here you can input links to work you’ve done, and various accomplishments documented online. Although this seems more helpful for writers or designers, anything that has been published on the web will give you credibility.

  • Blogs – shows your personality, talent as writer, and that you can juggle a job and personal development at the same time.
  • Submitted photos – Even if the job has nothing to do with photography, a well taken picture presents another side of your personality. If you’ve ever submitted pictures for a contest, you can most likely find that online.
  • Photo accounts – if you are a photographer and keep a photo account like Flickr, include that.
  • Articles/guest posts – even if you only wrote an informal guest post for a friend’s blog, or an article for the school newspaper, it adds up.
  • Awards/honors – for example, if you were on Dean’s list in college, try to find it online. Many schools publish that on their website.

Photos

If you treat Google+ like a professional network from the start, you can build a well rounded snapshot of yourself. LinkedIn is known as the professional network, but Google+ has it beat in the photo department. According to a study conducted for Careerbuilder.com, “More than half of the employers who participated in the survey said that provocative photos were the biggest factor contributing to a decision not to hire a potential employee.”

By creating a profile that you can trust your potential boss looking through, and providing it to them in the contact section of your resume, you can avoid this dilemma. Define your best self through the photos.  Try to include:

  • Travel photos
  • Work photos, if you have any of you in a work situation or with co-workers
  • Active photos, such as hiking pictures
  • Graduation pictures

Other Profiles

This is a smart way for you to direct a potential employer in the direction that will best represent you. Everyone has so many social media accounts, and Facebook should be at the bottom of the list for employers. Here you can add your Twitter account, LinkedIn, Quora. Any other account that you know will best represent you should be included.

45% of employers are screening potential candidates via social networks. Use Google+ to direct a potential employer in a positive direction. Google+ has the potential to represent you as well rounded, smart, and current. By showing your best, most employable side, your employer can trust you with their reputation. 

Bio: Jessica Sanders is an avid small business writer touching on topics from social media to telemarketing. She writes for an online resource that gives advice on topics including medical billing software for b2b lead generation resource, Resource Nation.


10 Biggest Mistakes Women Who Work in Male Dominated Industries Make

1. You are not a man so don’t try to be! This also extends to how you dress at work, keeping it feminine but appropriate. Outside of work this means not trying to be ‘one of the boys’.

 

2. Work is NOT a popularity contest. Great bosses and colleagues are respected not liked. Women frequently value being liked and worry what others will think if they say or do certain things. You have been employed in a professional capacity so put the insecurities aside and above all else act like a ‘insert your job title here’.

3. An extension to point 2: don’t ever put being liked above being smart. The ‘boys’ might like you for it but the bosses won’t promote you for it. For those of you with tertiary qualifications you are more than likely employed for your brains. Use them!

4. Women often focus too much on building strong relationships with their clients and not enough time looking to understand the business their clients operate in and honing their strategic skills and business insight. When a client moves and there isn’t a chemistry fit with the new person you will leave your company (and your own position at the company) exposed.

5. Women are far to tough on themselves. Most women develop and mature professionally quicker than men and have more EQ (Emotional Intelligence) so tend to dominate many of the sectors of male dominated industries that are relationship focuses (ie Advertising). However when it comes to  advancement they are often shy. Men tend to think they are at least half a role of job title ahead of themselves and will demand it. Women are the complete opposite and almost talk themselves out of a promotion and place themselves half a role or title behind where they usually are performing.

6. Not knowing how to say no. Don’t fall into this trap: ‘It’s the end of the discussion when a man says no, but the beginning of a negotiation when a woman says it’. Trust yourself and be firm.

7. Not keeping healthy, defined boundaries between work and leisure.

8. Not delegating! Naturally good multi-taskers women often struggle to delegate work.

9. Don’t sleep with any man at work, unless you plan on marrying him.

10. Women not supporting women. To quote Madeleine Albright “there is a special place in hell for women who don’t help other women.”

 


3 Defining Elements of a Hospitality Resume

What are the Defining Elements of Your Hospitality Resume?

By Anish Majumdar, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) 

Developing a new Hospitality resume can be a daunting prospect. What’s the best way to present yourself? Which elements of your career should be highlighted (and which left off)? One common misconception is that every part of your resume should be 100% original. Not only is this an incredible time-consuming approach, it has been shown, time and time again, to be ineffective. 

When recruiters and hiring agents evaluate a potential candidate, they’re primarily searching for 3-4 defining elements. The appeal of these elements are the driver behind who gets selected for interviews, and ultimately, who gets a job offer. Therefore, the main responsibility of your resume isn’t being original, but communicating these 3-4 defining elements in a variety of ways. 

Here are 3 ways to bring your defining elements to the forefront of your resume:

1. Develop A Powerful Opening Paragraph

A powerful resume opening “frames” the rest of the document, quickly outlining the areas where a candidate feels strongest and differentiating him or her from the competition. As a professional in the Hospitality industry, it’s your job to boil down everything you’ve accomplished to date into a list of 3-4 defining attributes. Feel free to be creative here; some candidates might wish to highlight a specialized certification, while others might want to call attention to a high-level responsibility at their previous job. Keep it short and to-the-point. When executed correctly, a strong opening paragraph will consistently result in a more in-depth examination of your resume by recruiters and hiring agents. 

2. Expand Upon Your Opening Paragraph In The Work History 

Many Hospitality jobseekers make the mistake of developing their work history before tackling the opening paragraph of the resume. Going in the opposite direction is a much more effective approach, as it will enable you to filter your work history through the 3-4 defining attributes you’ve identified. When describing responsibilities for the jobs you’ve held, always highlight those related to your defining attributes first. Also, be sure to create a “Key Accomplishments” or similar section for recent jobs that highlights concrete successes related to them. Never lose sight of the focus of these edits, which is communicating a particular set of skills that will set you apart from other professionals. 

3. Keep Closing Sections Relevant 

By executing the previous 2 steps, you’ve taken control of how you’re perceived as a candidate and made a strong case for why you’re suited for the position you’re applying for. End it on a high note by only highlighting relevant education credits, professional memberships, and other details at the tail end of the resume. The days of including a “Hobbies/Interests” section are long gone. If the content doesn’t directly support your ambitions, leave it off. 

About the Author 

Anish Majumdar, CPRW is a Career Expert and Owner at ResumeOrbit.com. 98% of clients report an increase in interviews within 30 days, and all work comes backed by a 110% Satisfaction or Money Back Guarantee (in writing). Submit your resume for a free critique today!

 


3 Defining Elements of a Biotech/Pharma Resume

What are the Defining Elements of Your Biotech/Pharma Resume?
By Anish Majumdar, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) 

Developing a new Biotech/Pharma resume can be a daunting prospect. What’s the best way to present yourself? Which elements of your career should be highlighted (and which left off)? One common misconception is that every part of your resume should be 100% original. Not only is this an incredible time-consuming approach, it has been shown, time and time again, to be ineffective. 

When recruiters and hiring agents evaluate a potential candidate, they’re primarily searching for 3-4 defining elements. The appeal of these elements are the driver behind who gets selected for interviews, and ultimately, who gets a job offer. Therefore, the main responsibility of your resume isn’t being original, but communicating these 3-4 defining elements in a variety of ways. 

Here are 3 ways to bring your defining elements to the forefront of your resume: 

1. Develop A Powerful Opening Paragraph 

A powerful resume opening “frames” the rest of the document, quickly outlining the areas where a candidate feels strongest and differentiating him or her from the competition. As a Biotech/Pharma professional, it’s your job to boil down everything you’ve accomplished to date into a list of 3-4 defining attributes. Feel free to be creative here; some candidates might wish to highlight an advanced degree or certification, while others might want to call attention to a high-level responsibility at their previous job. Keep it short and to-the-point. When executed correctly, a strong opening paragraph will consistently result in a more in-depth examination of your resume by recruiters and hiring agents. 

2. Expand Upon Your Opening Paragraph In The Work History 

Many Biotech/Pharma jobseekers make the mistake of developing their work history before tackling the opening paragraph of the resume. Going in the opposite direction is a much more effective approach, as it will enable you to filter your work history through the 3-4 defining attributes you’ve identified. When describing responsibilities for the jobs you’ve held, always highlight those related to your defining attributes first. Also, be sure to create a “Key Accomplishments” or similar section for recent jobs that highlights concrete successes related to them. Never lose sight of the focus of these edits, which is communicating a particular set of skills that will set you apart from other professionals. 

3. Keep Closing Sections Relevant 

By executing the previous 2 steps, you’ve taken control of how you’re perceived as a candidate and made a strong case for why you’re suited for the position you’re applying for. End it on a high note by only highlighting relevant education credits, professional memberships, and other details at the tail end of the resume.The days of including a “Hobbies/Interests” section are long gone. If the content doesn’t directly support your ambitions, leave it off. 

Read more biotech career tips. Find more biotech and pharma jobs by visiting the career center

About the Author 

Anish Majumdar, CPRW is a Career Expert and Owner at www.ResumeOrbit.com. 98% of clients report and increase in interviews within 30 days, and all work comes backed by a 110% Satisfaction or Money Back Guarantee. Submit your resume for a free critique today!


6 Ways to Prepare Yourself for a Management Job

Management Job

Many people aspire to be promoted to a managerial position as the key part of their career goals. It can be very rewarding. Many people are left pondering, “How do they get on that management track to begin with?” And, “What do I have to do to prepare?”

Both good questions, let’s outline what needs to take place to become a manager.

1. Outline your goals to your management. Get your boss in your corner to help mentor you and to give you opportunities to prove you are management material.

2. Look for opportunities to take on more. A key element to a management position is initiative. You won’t be told what to do, you have to assume responsibility and direction. Most groups have far more work than manpower to perform it all. Look for items that will create real impact to the business. Those will get you visibility which is important to your goals.

3. Find a role model. Observe the people who manage and find someone who you believe is both a great manager and is successful. Ask for them to mentor you and observe how they perform theirmanagement job. What makes them successful? You want to emulate some of that behavior.

4. Take classes and read. There are tons of management classes and books on management. Look for ones that are oriented toward the basics and beginning management as they will outline what you need to do in these early days. Higher level materials, while interesting, will assume you know these things and won’t go into much detail.

5. Ask to fill in. The boss will go on vacation or business travel. They have work to be done while they’re away and you can volunteer to cover for them or minimally to pick up some tasks of theirs. This will give you a taste of the work being performed and again demonstrate your ability to take on higher level responsibilities.

6. Seek leadership roles. A great way to get started in management is to take on the role of project management or leader to a work effort. Many of the needed management skills are used in these situations. You are facilitating a group of people to get something accomplished. To do that you will exercise such things as: planning, directing, communicating, gaining agreement, following up, and so on. Projects are a key way for business to get done and someone has to lead the effort – that can be you.

If you prepare yourself well, your first management position it can be the thing that will catapult you into higher levels and greater impact to your business. You need to make sure that at this stage you have thought through just how different this job is from what you have done before so you can shift gears to be equally awesome as a manager.