Easwari

Career Adviser


Creating Employee Buy-in for Social Media Marketing

Convincing management of the need for a social media strategy and its implementation can be hard enough as it is, but when that strategy also needs the direct support of the employees through their accounts it can be even harder to implement. Employees’ social media accounts – for a number of personal and even possibly legal reasons – can be difficult to gain access to or even to give input on. Employees’might work from 9-5 and sometimes much longer hours but their social media accounts represent them 24 hours a day.

Recently I dealt with this issue while attempting to revamp my company’s LinkedIn presence; these are four ways in which we, as Social Media Managers, can create a sense that a campaign is more than just about the company’s brand,but that it’s also about your employee’s personal brand too.

Get the Mandate from the Executive team and then Lead by Example from the Top Down:

Creating a Social Media Buy-InRegardless of the size of the company, initiatives that cross departmental borders and affect multiple ranks of a company fail every day. This is for various reasons, but one reason is avoidable –  a lack of commitment from the executives.

Once you have the blessing of the company’s management to spearhead a social media campaign with an all-encompassing approach that includes the employees’ social media profiles as well. You’ll need to start with the executives and management first. This would act as the proof of the commitment of the executive team, that they’re leading the way, and of their faith in you.

An additional benefit of making it about the employees is that you are also getting the executives to work with you and you will have a better opportunity to adapt their profiles without stepping on their toes in the process. The executives of a company are the investor,- partner-, and sometimes customer-facing side of the company. Having them with a blank LinkedIn profile or worse, not having one, is not only a terrible example for your employees but also a strategic mistake.

Make Everyone a Part of the Decision Process:

One idea out of the handbook on effective managing is to ask for input and ideas when seeking to create maximum buy-in. To translate that idea and use it in this case one could ask employees and managers affected, their feelings on social media and how the company could use it. Doing this personally would be a little excessive and poor use of your time, instead I like to take a few minutes and use Survey Gizmo or Survey Monkey to create a short ten question survey and distribute it. If you have a low percentage of completions you could consider making the survey departmental identifiable to see how many in each department have completed the survey.

Attempt to keep the survey honest by keeping it basic and unidentifiable. Use demographics, such as years with the company, employment level (Entry level, Senior, Manager, Director, Executive), and an age range (I prefer choices of 5-6 years). That will cover your first three questions your next seven questions should be framed using Likert Scale questions as opposed to simple yes or no questions. This will help determine the degree an employee agrees or disagrees with the question rather than if they simply agree or disagree. Using a Likert Scale also helps you in creating a comparative survey at a later date.

The survey could be framed around questions these questions:

  1. Do you feel that our company could benefit from a social media strategy?
  2. To date has our company done a good job representing our brand on social media?
  3. Do you feel that you have a good understanding of social media sites?
  4. Do you feel that our customers are accessible through social media?
  5. Please rate these social media sites as they fit in with our brand and services:
    1. Facebook
    2. Twitter
    3. LinkedIn
    4. Pinterest
    5. Other:
  6. Rate these sites on their ability to reach our customers and their decision makers:
    1. Facebook
    2. Twitter
    3. LinkedIn
    4. Pinterest
    5. Other:
  7. Would you like to receive information on a Social Media’s sites best practices?

Invest the Time and Money: Showing your Employees that they are a part of the Brand too:

  • Run Training Sessions:

After you and your management have decided on a social media strategy and which sites to focus on you have undoubtedly done a fair amount of research into the site, its offerings, and how make the most of the site.

Through training sessions, whether in-depth or not you can cover many of the important points with your employees and coworkers. This training is a time where you can send a clear message that this social media strategy is about not just the company’s brand, but also about the employee’s personal brand as well. That you’re putting the time and effort into them so that they look the best that they possibly can to whomever might come across them on the internet.

  • Create Best Practice Guides:

Making this information available to your staff through Training Sessions is a great way to distribute the information in one voice. Best Practice Guides will add to that by giving them access to the same information again, but where they can digest it at their own speed.

I’ve even gone as far as to distribute these Best Practice guides not only by email, but also on my SlideShare account (Which can also be found my LinkedIn):


How Google+ Can Supplement Your Job Hunt

With Google+ on track to reach 400 million users by the end of 2012, it’s time to get on the bandwagon. However, I am not urging you to join for the sake of having another Facebook to keep up. No, I advise you get involved with Google+ as a means to present your best assets to jobs.

While LinkedIn is still a valuable asset for those who are unemployed and networking, Google+ has the potential to reach a broader audience, and present you in a more well-rounded light. The top three attributes an employer is looking for are technical skills, interpersonal skills and strength of character; Google+ can help you present this.

Google+ brings together the best of Facebook and LinkedIn. You can upload photos, giving employers a snap shot of who you are, present your accomplishments in an organized way, and then direct them to your other social networks. With your Google+ profile on a resume, you can rest easy knowing your potential boss is seeing the most employable side of you.

Portfolio

The most important aspect of Google+ as a resume extension is the portfolio feature. Here you can input links to work you’ve done, and various accomplishments documented online. Although this seems more helpful for writers or designers, anything that has been published on the web will give you credibility.

  • Blogs – shows your personality, talent as writer, and that you can juggle a job and personal development at the same time.
  • Submitted photos – Even if the job has nothing to do with photography, a well taken picture presents another side of your personality. If you’ve ever submitted pictures for a contest, you can most likely find that online.
  • Photo accounts – if you are a photographer and keep a photo account like Flickr, include that.
  • Articles/guest posts – even if you only wrote an informal guest post for a friend’s blog, or an article for the school newspaper, it adds up.
  • Awards/honors – for example, if you were on Dean’s list in college, try to find it online. Many schools publish that on their website.

Photos

If you treat Google+ like a professional network from the start, you can build a well rounded snapshot of yourself. LinkedIn is known as the professional network, but Google+ has it beat in the photo department. According to a study conducted for Careerbuilder.com, “More than half of the employers who participated in the survey said that provocative photos were the biggest factor contributing to a decision not to hire a potential employee.”

By creating a profile that you can trust your potential boss looking through, and providing it to them in the contact section of your resume, you can avoid this dilemma. Define your best self through the photos.  Try to include:

  • Travel photos
  • Work photos, if you have any of you in a work situation or with co-workers
  • Active photos, such as hiking pictures
  • Graduation pictures

Other Profiles

This is a smart way for you to direct a potential employer in the direction that will best represent you. Everyone has so many social media accounts, and Facebook should be at the bottom of the list for employers. Here you can add your Twitter account, LinkedIn, Quora. Any other account that you know will best represent you should be included.

45% of employers are screening potential candidates via social networks. Use Google+ to direct a potential employer in a positive direction. Google+ has the potential to represent you as well rounded, smart, and current. By showing your best, most employable side, your employer can trust you with their reputation. 

Bio: Jessica Sanders is an avid small business writer touching on topics from social media to telemarketing. She writes for an online resource that gives advice on topics including medical billing software for b2b lead generation resource, Resource Nation.